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The script Ohio wrote in its
past four Mid-American Confer-
ence games was acted out once
again Wednesday at The Convo,
as first-half struggles continued
to plague the Bobcats.
Unlike in games past,
Ohio didn’t dominate second
half play, and Bowling Green
climbed from the first half defi-
cit to win by a count of 58-56.
Ohio (13-5, 3-2 MAC) started
the game hot with two Maurice
Ndour threes that propelled the
Bobcats to an early 15-6 lead at
the 12:19 mark in the first half.
Bowling Green (9-9, 3-2
MAC) made adjustments on
the defensive end at that point,
however, confounding Ohio by
switching from the press de-
fense it has used for a good por-
tion of the season to a zone that
played a role in the Bobcats’ 18
turnovers.
“We played awful against
the zone the entire night,” said
Ohio coach Jim Christian. “All
the concepts that we teach and
work on, we just didn’t do any
of them. We were just bad in all
areas of zone offense and we
need to get much better.”
After beginning regulation
with ghastly three of 16 makes
from the field, the Falcons
found a way to remove the lid
from the top of the rim and shot
66 percent (eight of 12) for the
final 11:45 of the half.
Senior guard Travis Wilkins
provided Ohio with a 33-30 lead
going into the break, sinking
three free throws with three
seconds left in the half.
The second stanza started
smoothly for the Bobcats, as
they drained three of their first
six shots en route to a 39-37
lead at the first media timeout
of the final half.
It was at the 15:27 mark that
Bowling Green coach Louis Orr
used a timeout to pull out the
zone once again. It had similar
results to those of the first half,
holding Ohio to 17 points and
forcing six turnovers in the re-
mainder of the contest.
“We have two primary
The first senate member to resign was Kelsey Higgins, the di-
rector of interns, who put on her coat in the middle of the meeting
and walked out after bursting into tears.
“This is the first year where I’m disgusted and embarrassed by
the members of this student senate,” Higgins said.
Senate decided to postpone the vice president election until
next week to allow the whole student body to vote.
In the meantime, Emma Wright has been nominated as the
interim vice president and Emma Clark, former board of elec-
tions chair, volunteered to plan the upcoming election and
count the votes.
Details on the logistics of the elections will be released later,
but for now, Clark plans to ban the candidates from using any cam-
paign funds at all, “because it’s up to the students and they should
make their own choices,” Clark said.
The list of candidates for vice president has shortened since
last week, however, as both Allie Erwin and Jacob Chaffin took
their names off of the ballot.
“There are those who want to empower … and there are those
that want to be in power,” Chaffin said. “I cannot, in good con-
science, continue to serve as an elected member of a body that
doesn’t value democracy in the same way I do.”
THE INDEPENDENT VOICE
OF OHIO UNIVERSITY AND ATHENS
THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014
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POST MODERN
WALTER FIELDHOUSE
PARTY LINES
Construction on the athletic center has been delayed
again, but some will still get to use it this year.
PAGE 6
A new column weighs in on Sarah Palin’s recent remarks
about Barack Obama.
PAGE 2
Despite a drop in popularity, one video rental store is alive
and well in Athens.
PAGE 3
SENATE IN SHAMBLES
ALL PHOTOS BY KAITLIN OWENS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Anna Morton, the student senate president, listens to students speak out in Walter Hall. As of Wednesday, Student senate fell apart at this meeting after the resignations of Kelsey Higgins, Evan Taylor and treasurer Austin
LaForest, and the retractions of two vice presidential nominations.
Vice-commissioner Kate Clausen disscusses allegations of the VOICE party stealing
newspapers during last spring’s election. Clausen denied involvement in the scandal on
Wednesday.
STUDENTS CRITCIZED, RESIGN AFTER WEEKLY MEETING
ACCUSATIONS AND
DENIALS: WHERE
IS THE TRUTH?
Report
shows
decline
in arrests
Increase in officer
presence and more
traffic stops have
resulted in lower crime
rates, says Athens
Police Department
Chief Tom Pyle.
The Board of Trustees
will meet Thursday and
Friday to discuss various
university issues.
ALLAN SMITH
SENIOR WRITER
DANIELLE KEETON-OLSEN
STAFF WRITER
CHRISTIAN HOPPENS
SENIOR WRITER
A
new vice president was not elected as planned at Wednesday night’s Student Senate meeting. Instead,
two senators and one executive resigned, two candidates for the vice presidency retracted their
nominations and a total of 24 students stood up for the student Speak Out session.
Many of the students who spoke out addressed a lack of faith in their senate representatives and their
wish to allow anyone in the student body to vote for the vice president after current Senate President Anna
Morton vacated the position.
“I didn’t come here for meaningless banter and pointed fingers,” said Gracie Keyes, an Ohio University
student studying war and peace. “It’s stupid. This is embarrassing.”
CAROLINE BARTELS
FOR THE POST
MARIA DEVITO
STAFF WRITER
Athens’ notorious party-relat-
ed history aside, service calls for
narcotics, alcohol-related arrests
and reports of assaults and van-
dalism have been on the down-
swing over the past few years,
according to the Athens Police
Department’s Annual Report.
Police say an increased em-
phasis on presence around town
and a large increase in the vol-
ume of traffic stops have contrib-
uted to the decrease in crime.
“Once you start doing that,
that can bring other things down,”
Lt. Jeff McCall said. “If you’re out
in the community and people see
that and recognize it, they under-
stand that if they’re going to do
something, they’re more likely to
be apprehended than maybe out
in more of a rural area.”
APD Chief Tom Pyle said he
believes the increase in officer
presence has led to a less bellig-
erent and calmer attitude over-
all Uptown.
“Since we’re having some
impact on the party culture
and whatnot, I could say that
(it’s calmed down Uptown), but
I don’t have the data to back it
up,” Pyle said. “All I can say is
the drop in assaults coincides
with increased staffing and
SEE REPORTS, PAGE 4
SEE BOARD, PAGE 4
SEE MBB, PAGE 3
SEE PAPERS, PAGE 4
SEE SENATE, PAGE 4
Ohio University’s first Board of
Trustees meeting of the year will
include discussion of disputed de-
cisions from the end of last year.
In addition to continuing
discussion on university issues
such as the Capital Improvement
Plan and the OHIO Guarantee,
the Board of Trustees will re-
vote on OU President Roderick
McDavis’ one-percent pay raise
of $4,150, Katie Quaranta, OU
spokeswoman, said in an email.
In addition, OU General
Counsel John Biancamano will
propose changes to the process
of evaluating the president’s sal-
ary for the future, said Board
of Trustees Secretary Peter
Mather in an email.
The president’s evaluation
for this academic year will be-
gin in the spring, Mather said.
However, before the board
can vote Friday, they will re-
ceive updates from the aca-
demics, resources, governance
and audit committees — all
meeting Thursday.
This board meeting will also
feature a joint academics and
resources committee meeting
Thursday morning to discuss
the OHIO Guarantees’ updated
details, the University Comple-
tion Plan — aimed at granting
Changes,
updates on
agenda for
Trustees
Unbalanced play from the Bobcats results in loss to Bowling Green
MEN'S BASKETBALL
Ohio University’s first-year
student trustee released the
names of Student Senate col-
leagues and claimed that they
stole nearly 1,000 issues of The
Post — without proof of the stu-
dents’ involvement and without
first talking to police.
Keith Wilbur, who was ap-
pointed to his position by Gov.
John Kasich, told The New Po-
litical, an online news web-
site, the names of six students
Tuesday night, who he claims to
stole the complementary paper
from newsstands last spring.
Wilbur also claimed Jordan
Ballinger, governmental affairs
commissioner, organized the
event. The others accused were
mostly freshmen or lower-level
senate commissioners.
STUDENT SENATE
COLLAPSE
Multiple resignations plague
the body as drama continues to
unfold following the departure of
former President Nick Southall.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 4
Kate Clausen
expresses her
innocence against
Keith Wilbur’s
accusation that
she was involved
in stealing Posts
Allie Erwin
withdrew her
name for the vice
president position
and endorsed
Mary Kate
Gallagher
Kelsey Higgins
resigned as
director of interns
because she was
“disgusted and
embarrassed” by
senate members
7:18 P.M. 7:56 P.M. 8:11 P.M.
In The New Political article
“Senate president, trustee accuse
former ticket of newspaper theft,”
I have been unjustly accused of a
crime, and inaccurately excluded
from the Senate body. It is hard for
me to understand why this article
would come out at this time, but
there is much in this article that is
troubling. I know for a fact that I
was not involved in the theft of the
newspapers, and I am confident
that the others blamed in the
article did nothing of the sort. If
Anna and Keith had knowledge of
this theft why did they not come
forward?
I remember the meeting that
was mentioned. Keith asked us
about some text messages where
we did indeed joke about taking
the papers, but it was joke. He told
us to delete the messages anyhow,
and then he proceeded to yell at
the people in the room in the most
disgusting, unprofessional man-
ner I have ever had the displea-
sure of witnessing. I was not privy
to any further information on the
issue, but I was warned that if we
ever mentioned the issue Keith
would “ruin” the rest of our Ohio
University career. This was yelled
at the scared freshman sitting in
the room while Anna Morton sat
and watched the utterly degrading
way the people on her ticket, those
who were devoted to helping her
get elected because we believed in
her, were being treated.
So why is this “informa-
tion” being divulged now? I do
not know, but I see a trend of
President Morton trying to make
Jordan Ballinger look bad. I
have no idea why. I have worked
closely with Jordan on Senate for
two years. I plan on supporting
his campaign, because I believe
in him. After last year’s ticket, I
am wary where I put my trust as
the former president and current
president do not seem worthy of it.
I have questioned Jordan before,
and he has never let me down.
He accomplishes a lot for the
student body and there is proof of
his work. Yet, what is published
are negative comments that have
no objective basis. I am a proud
member of governmental affairs
where we have worked hard try-
ing to have Student Trustee Voting
Rights passed in the House, and
it did. We are moving to the Ohio
Senate this semester in hopes of
making this dream a reality.
If Anna and Keith claim to
have known the ticket committed
this act all this time, as leaders of
the ticket they should have come
forward. Seeing this transpire
now only looks to me like a politi-
cal stunt of sorts that is meant to
distract from current issues and
will undoubtedly result in a great-
er divide between Student Senate
and those who wish to see more
from such an influential body, like
I do. I did not commit this act,
and I hope that this source and
others will be respectable and not
unjustly accuse me or others of
such things without any hope for
defense, particularly with little
evidence.
Kate Clausen is a sophomore study-
ing communication studies and the vice
commissioner for governmental affairs
and public policy for Student Senate.
To whom it may concern:
I would like to take the time
to address the recent accusa-
tions about my involvement
in what many have decided to
label as “PostGate.” In a recent
article, I was wrongly accused
of stealing local newspapers
and disposing them. This is
not true. Immediately after
this news was available to me,
I contacted President Morton
and inquired as to why she and
Keith Wilbur falsely accused
me of this act. She then told
me that she was aware of the
fact that Keith misspoke and
that she would work to rectify
the situation. Again, I am inno-
cent of these accusations and
both President Morton and my
words will affirm that.
Jalen Carter is the East Green sena-
tor for Student Senate.
THE
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU
2
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014
Opinion
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THIS ISSUE
COPY EDITORS: Madison Lantelme-Capitano, Ian Ording, Su Park
INSIDE DESIGNER: Emily Russell
FRONT PAGE DESIGNER: Jake Newton
POST MODERN DESIGNER: Kelsey Bell
PICTURE EDITOR: Conor Ralph
VOLUME 104 ISSUE 78
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MANAGING EDITOR
Nicolien Buholzer
ASST. MANAGING EDITOR
Jim Ryan
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Haylee Pearl
CAMPUS EDITOR
Sara Jerde
LOCAL EDITOR
Joshua Jamerson
CULTURE EDITOR
Kristin Salaky
SPORTS EDITOR
Chad Lindskog
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
Jason E. Chow
DESIGN EDITORS
Kelsey Bell, Jake Newton
COPY CHIEF
Emily DuGranrut
ASST. COPY CHIEF
Taylor LaPuma
ONLINE EDITOR
Emily Bamforth
PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR
Sara Lowenstein
BUSINESS MANAGER
RJ Sumney
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Ryan Clark
Senate’s latest
drama typifies
bigger problem
CARTOON EDITORIAL Editorial cartoons represent the majority opinion of The Post’s executive editors.
“I don’t think that I have
ever been to a video
store. Maybe when I was
10, but other than that,
no. I have Netflix.”
— Katy Brown
freshman studying
sport management
“How often do I use
a video store? Like
Blockbuster? Almost
never. I tend to stick to
my Netflix account.”
— Ivan Velez
senior studying
communication studies
“What’s a video store?
I think I used the one
around campus Spring
Semester of last year,
but I’m not sure what it’s
called.”
— Shawn Adams
junior studying
exercise physiology
“I honestly can’t tell
you the last time I’ve
been to a video store. I
use my HBO Go account
or rent movies for free
at Alden Library.”
— Thomas Zigo
senior studying
psychology
“I went to them when
I was 5. I just can’t see
anyone using them
nowadays.”
— Mary Stuard
freshman studying
history and pre-law
When is the last time you rented a movie from a store?
POST STREETVIEW
—Compiled by Zane Parsons
Wednesday night, we followed the many twists and
turns of the Student Senate meeting, which was supposed
to end with a new vice president and a sigh of relief for sen-
ate members. Many of you tuned in to the goings on too, if
the reaction on social media was any indication of interest.
Usually, an uptick in student interaction would be a
positive for senate — after all, it looks to represent the
student body — but there was not much good news to come
from Walter Hall. Three senate members resigned during
the meeting, including Treasurer Austin LaForest, who did
so without actually being present for the proceedings. His
successor was named fewer than 10 minutes later.
The body is in such disarray that even its hired public
relations manager resigned this week. All of this was on the
heels of a controversy that was already brewing before senate
members had even grabbed their morning cup of coffee.
Late Tuesday night, The New Political published an ar-
ticle that quoted Student Trustee Keith Wilbur and Student
Senate President Anna Morton in alleging that other senate
members were involved in the theft of Post newspapers last
spring.
We would like to note that our interest in the newspa-
per theft story is not personal — we are not upset about
the incident and bear no ill will toward the perpetrators,
whoever they might be.
Rather, we believe there is a more significant issue at hand.
Student Senate is meant to be a marketplace of ideas — a
place in which students’ ideas are solicited, weighed carefully
and brought to administrators, trustees and legislators.
If senate members did in fact play a part in the theft of
the newspapers, which featured The Post’s endorsement of
the FUSS ticket, the opposition party to the quasi-incum-
bent VOICE, that is about as contrary to the above mission
as you can get.
Also concerning is the timing of these allegations,
which only emerged after the resignation of former Presi-
dent Nick Southall, who was named as a conspirator in The
New Political article. Convenient, no?
It is also fishy that two of the university’s most prominent
student leaders had knowledge of an alleged crime but did not
take the information to law enforcement. It’s hard to argue
that their intentions are not purely self-serving if they didn’t
feel compelled to come forward when it first happened.
So not only do we have allegations of senate members
actively working to suppress opinions, we also have leaders
who sat on that information — at least until coming forward
only when it fit their schedules and, presumably, their political
agendas.
That is completely unacceptable.
If Morton is committed to righting the ship, she should
fully investigate the allegations and, if there is any proof,
ensure those individuals are never part of senate again.
This is just another in a seemingly never-ending series
of snafus involving senate. But we doubt this is rock bot-
tom. With such shaky leadership in its past — from execu-
tives paying themselves to build their own website to a
drunken run-in with law enforcement in Florida — it is no
surprise that senate is crumbling from within.
The organization itself might not be fundamentally bro-
ken, but its members have repeatedly demonstrated their
self-serving tendencies while holding supposedly represen-
tative positions. If the remaining members of senate want
to rebuild, they will need to salvage the valuable pieces
and start afresh.
So, what’s next for senate? We don’t know. And we don’t
think anyone in senate knows either.
Editorials represent the majority opinion of The Post’s executive editors.
LETTERS FROM STUDENT SENATORS
Leaders should have come forward sooner
COLUMN
Palin’s comment ensures politics stay stupid
Theft claims are untrue
This is a column about politics
— mostly national, because it
was decided that as local editor
of The Post, perhaps I shouldn’t
take opinions on the happenings
of Athens City Council or Athens
County Sheriff Pat Kelly’s office.
Off the bat, I’d like to say two
things.
First, I offer a disclaimer:
The only two opinion pieces I
have ever had published in a
newspaper were in The Post,
and they were both about Kanye
West’s awesomeness. I sincerely
hope that doesn’t take away my
credibility in the mind of anyone
reading this page when I start
writing about America’s foreign
and domestic policies.
Secondly, a bit about me: I love
politics but I strongly believe that
it gets stupid really quickly when
folks — especially columnists,
whom I feel have an obligation not
to just pick a side but also to add
something to the conversation —
blindly make arguments solely for
Democrats or Republicans.
I have a perfect example.
Someone sent to me a head-
line Monday that read “On MLK
Day, tone-deaf Sarah Palin says
Obama plays the race card.” I
clicked the link.
The story was about a Face-
book post Sarah Palin wrote on
Martin Luther King Jr. Day that
read in its entirety:
Happy MLK, Jr. Day!
“I have a dream that my four
little children will one day live
in a nation where they will not
be judged by the color of their
skin, but by the content of their
character.” – Martin Luther
King, Jr.
Mr. President, in honor of
Martin Luther King, Jr. and
all who commit to ending any
racial divide, no more playing
the race card.
See what I mean by politics
can get stupid?
What a cheap shot. And even
worse, it’s a cheap shot that is
highly offensive and doesn’t even
make any sense.
I’d love to know what Palin
considers “playing the race card.”
It could be President Barack
Obama’s quote in The New
Yorker: “There’s no doubt that
there’s some folks who just really
dislike me because they
don’t like the idea of a
black president. Now,
the flipside of it is there
are some black folks
and maybe some white
folks who really like me
and give me the benefit
of the doubt precisely
because I’m a black
president.”
But that just seems
like fact, right? After all,
there are people who
don’t like black people.
And there are people who don’t
like white people, too. To each his
or her own (I guess).
But I’d say “playing the race
card” would be similar to playing
the sex card. For example, a
woman who is doing 75 mph in a
school zone but flirts with a male
officer in an attempt to get out of
a ticket. In that vein, for Obama
to be “playing the race card,”
that would be like him saying the
White House Press Corps only
beat him up about the Obamacare
rollout because he’s black.
Regardless of how “playing the
race card” is defined by Palin or
anyone else, including me, this is
schoolyard behavior. This is using
every little thing — even a federal
holiday recognizing an American
hero — to bash the other side.
What Palin said is disrespect-
ful to King’s legacy because he
was a man who wanted to bring
this nation together, and Palin
used MLK’s message in a polariz-
ing fashion to tear people apart.
Joshua Jamerson is a junior study-
ing journalism and local editor at The
Post. What do you think about Sarah
Palin’s remarks? Talk politics with him
at jj360410@ohiou.edu.
Joshua Jamerson
local editor
Party Lines
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 3 THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014
Post Modern
>> PREMI ERE VI DEO I N ATHENS THRI VES @THEPOSTCULTURE
From his post behind the front desk, he has full
reign over the stacks of films, games and novelties that
line the walls and shelves of the 15-year-old video rent-
al store. Werner, a manager who has been employed by
Premiere Video, 284 E. State St., for the past 10 years,
sees the writing on the wall: Video rental stores are fad-
ing fast, their demise hastened by the rising popularity
of rental services such as Redbox and online entities
like Netflix.
“It’s definitely a changing market,” Werner said. “I
doubt there will be any video stores maybe in 10 years.”
Consumer spending on video is in the midst of a
seven-year downturn, despite a modest $18 billion
bump in 2012 sales that carried over into the first
quarter of 2013, according to a report by the Enter-
tainment Merchants Association. Most in the movie
rental industry, however, are still conscious that its
future is bleak.
They aren’t as much divided on how to slow its de-
mise as they are hunkering down to continue stocking
the latest cinematic hits while they can. Their remedy is
simple — do what they’ve always done, stocking movies
and hoping customers keep seeking them out.
OLD FAITHFULS
One such customer is Ed Fisher, an Athens resi-
dent who has been frequenting Premiere Video “pret-
ty much daily” since a number of other area rental
stores went out of business in the late 2000s. He tends
to gravitate toward thought-provoking films, he said
— everything from lesser-known documentaries
to smash TV series Breaking Bad — and he swears
he doesn’t have his own Premiere Video waiting list
despite having rented “thousands” of films there.
Though he is a self-proclaimed movie buff, not every-
thing he rents is to his liking.
“Of those thousands that I’ve rented, I certainly
wouldn’t say that I’ve watched them all,” Fisher said.
“At least 10 minutes,” Werner interjected from the
other side of the checkout counter. “Time is valuable.
You don’t want to just watch any old garbage.”
In that same vein, Premiere Video management has
made a conscious effort to only offer products custom-
ers seek when they come to the store. The same “val-
ue-added” products — records, books and electronics
— that keep large independent stores bustling have
doomed a number of Athens-area retailers. Seven-year
employee Isaac Slater said Premiere Video employees
have been there to watch, documenting exactly what the
store didn’t want to do, while at least five competitors
went out of business.
“A lot of these places, when we did competitor analy-
sis, we would go there and they would have brand-new
Blu-Rays on sale for $40,” Slater said. “It’s like, ‘What are
you going to do with those?’ Because no one’s going to
buy them, right?”
Instead, Premiere Video has focused on its bread
— er, kernels — and butter, renting games and movies,
selling surplus stock for little more than pocket change
and peddling candy and soft drinks near the checkout
counter. Employees also prioritize customer service and
family-friendly specials.
A PERSONAL TOUCH
Slater is the storewide pop culture aficionado, and
Werner has viewed his fair share of Premiere Video’s 10
to 15 thousand movie collection. Between the two and
several Ohio University student workers, they can han-
dle just about any far-reaching question that’s flung their
way — something customers appreciate.
“That guy up there, he has always been very helpful
T
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How Athens’ Premiere Video rental store
has survived the digital shift
JIM RYAN • ASST. MANAGING EDITOR
The shrill sound of a
ringing phone, beep of a
barcode scanner, clicking of
keyboard keys and slamming
of cash-register drawers
provide the soundtrack for
Jason Werner’s workday at
Premiere Video.
to me since I’ve been coming here,” said Derrick Ma-
son, motioning in Werner’s direction while combing the
store’s west wall. “If I can’t remember a movie but I can
remember the actor, he’ll help me find which movie I’m
looking for. Even if I may not be able to name it, he helps
me out.”
Customer service, Werner and Slater said, is king.
Without it, many of their regulars might instead rent
from their kiosk competitors. Still, Mason, a Columbus
resident and Hocking College student, said he heads to
Redbox when he wants to grab a movie late at night or
only needs it for a couple hours, but relies on the rental
store when he’s looking to score several films or a free
children’s movie. Werner agrees that each pick-up rental
entity has carved a worthy place in the entertainment
market — at least for now.
“I think there’s definitely room for both,” he said. “If
you want to spontaneously, ‘Oh, I want to watch The
Hangover,’ all of a sudden, you can come and grab it from
us. If you do the other stuff, they can both fit.”
HIDDEN GEMS
Premiere Video’s games and adult sections account
for smaller portions of its inventory, which employees
liquidate once it becomes outdated. A table containing
movie specials recently included titles ranging from
Bruce Willis’ 2012 flop Lay the Favorite ($.95), to an un-
censored cut of Jersey Shore: Season One ($7.95) and
seven copies of Academy Award-winning war thriller
Zero Dark Thirty ($3.95 apiece.) Variety keeps custom-
ers loyal, Slater said. Although Premiere Video lacks
some rare films, it has the most sought-after cinematog-
raphy from the last several decades.
“Where do you find these great works of art? Netflix
doesn’t have them. Hulu doesn’t have them,” Slater said.
“Between here and the two movie theaters in town,
I think everyone pretty much gets the best of what this
region has to offer.”
That, compounded with the fact that many in Athens
County have spotty or outdated home Internet setups,
thus diminishing their ability to stream content wireless-
ly, is another reason Werner said Premiere Video is still
successful. Blockbuster — which had 9,000 storefronts
in 2004, including one on State Street — announced in
November it would shutter its final 300 brick-and-mortar
locations.
“Consumer demand is clearly moving to digital distri-
bution of video entertainment,” said Joseph P. Clayton,
president and chief executive officer of DISH, Blockbust-
er’s parent company in a statement.
Students such as Leah Keiter, a freshman studying
journalism, tend to gravitate toward that trend, renting
online, from kiosks or for free from Alden Library. Much
of students’ reasoning for doing so, she said, is simplicity
and being able to watch at their own pace.
“You don’t have to go anywhere,” she said of stream-
ing content online. “It doesn’t have to be a huge event to
watch a movie. I like watching TV shows condensed — I
like to watch a lot of hours at once. If I don’t watch more
than one episode in a sitting, I’ll never watch it again.”
IN THE CLEAR -- FOR NOW
Students account for a small fraction of Premiere
Video’s visitors, Werner said. He also said that the
store is debt-free and that he doesn’t think his job will
be in jeopardy anytime soon. Business is “sustainable”
for the time being, though he did acknowledge that it
will likely experience a “steeper and steeper drop” as
time passes. For now, he’s content providing Athens
folks with films they want — “foul weather friends”
this time of year. For those like Fisher, such films
aren’t as much a relaxing step back from life but a way
to contemplate it.
“It’s kind of weak. I mean, why are you watching
somebody else’s life?” he said. “It’s entertainment, but
there’s far more serious things to be contemplating than
entertainment.”
Like the demise of an industry, for example. But then
again, falling market shares and new avenues for film
consumption haven’t shuttered Premiere Video as of yet.
“We keep it basic, and we haven’t went beyond our
needs,” Werner said. “I think that’s a large reason why
we’ve stayed in there.”
KATIE KLANN| PHOTO EDITOR
TOP: Nandini Stockton and her son, Ruari Ferrante browse titles at Premiere Video.
MIDDLE: Jason Werner, the store’s manager, sorts returned videos. BOTTOM: The Stock-
ton’s head to their car after renting movies. @JIMRYAN015
JR992810@OHIOU.EDU
A 21-year-old mother pleaded
guilty Tuesday to one charge of
theft after stealing more than
$1,000 worth of merchandise from
Athens Wal-Mart.
Jennifer Smith, 21, gave up her
right to a jury trial after pleading
guilty to an indictment, charging
one count of theft — a felony of the
fifth degree — at her pretrial, which
had been postponed from Dec. 11
because she recently had a baby.
Smith had originally pleaded
not guilty at her arraignment April
17 in the Athens County Common
Pleas Court. Since then, she had
been ordered to stay away from
Athens Wal-Mart at 929 E. State St.
According to court docu-
ments, she stole $1,015.79 worth of
merchandise from the store Aug.
11, 2012.
She took houseware products,
a soccer set and other unidenti-
fied items, according to the court
documents.
Smith will spend 180 days in
jail and will not be eligible for judi-
cial release. She could also owe a
maximum fine of $1,000.
Wilbur was campaign man-
ager for the senate VOICE ticket
when the papers were stolen from
in or near Baker University Cen-
ter, Alden Library, Bentley Hall
and Scott Quadrangle on April
17. That day, The Post endorsed
the opposing ticket, FUSS, which
included students who were less
involved with senate at the time.
“The real story isn’t about the
six people, it’s about Jordan who
orchestrated this,” Wilbur said.
Ballinger is running for next
year’s senate president and denies
being involved with the incident.
“I mean, really the whole story
is just pointing fingers,” Ballinger
said.
The VOICE ticket included cur-
rent Senate President Anna Mor-
ton; previous Senate President
Nick Southall who resigned in
December; and former Treasurer
Austin LaForest, who resigned at
Wednesday’s meeting.
Wilbur also suggested previ-
ous senate executives were in-
volved in the theft, including Am-
rit Saini, who was senate’s vice
president at the time the papers
were stolen.
“It’s just become too hierarchal
in the fact that people are using
their positions in their body to in-
timidate other members into their
beliefs and opinions and this is
evidence of that sort of influence
— from Amrit all the way down to
the senators,” Wilbur said.
Morton said she remembers
Ballinger, Saini and Southall jok-
ing about stealing the papers after
the endorsement was released.
“I have bigger fish to fry,” Saini
said, on the current situation.
“Strong evidence” of who stole
the papers led Wilbur to ask Mor-
ton to gather the six students in
James Hall for a discussion last
spring.
“We weren’t treated very well.
It was disgusting,” said Kate Clau-
sen, sophomore studying commu-
nication studies and vice commis-
sioner for governmental affairs.
“He was saying he would destroy
our future if we said anything. We
were freshmen. We were scared.
He forbid us so harshly from
speaking out and now he’s accus-
ing those he yelled at.”
Morton said she believes those
six weren’t involved.
“It was not their fault and they
shouldn’t be pinpointed,” Morton
said.
Five of six students returned
a request for comment and said
they didn’t steal the papers, but
most admitted to joking about
stealing them.
“Quite honestly, I was being
verbally abused for 30 minutes
and then I was threatened that
if I ever said anything that my, I
think it was something to the ef-
fect of, professional career at Ohio
University would no longer exist,”
said Gabby Bacha, a sophomore
studying political science and a
South Green Senator.
The Post editor at the time the
papers were stolen, Pat Holmes,
filed a report with the Ohio Uni-
versity Police Department.
Executive editors also pub-
lished an editorial in the newspa-
per asking for additional informa-
tion.
OUPD Chief Andrew Pow-
ers said he couldn’t “confirm or
deny or comment” whether Wil-
bur or Morton’s revelations were
already part of the department’s
ongoing investigation on the
open larceny case.
“I don’t know how it will po-
tentially impact the investiga-
tion,” Powers said. “These folks
are certainly at liberty to make
statements.”
Law enforcement agencies
typically refuse to comment on
open investigations until closed,
which sometimes comes with
“all sorts of rumors and things,”
Powers said.
Morton said she would go to
the police if she knew who was
responsible.
The Post has a circulation
of 10,000 and its revenue relies
on mainly ads. It spends about
$200,000 annually on printing
costs, said Ryan Clark, current
Post editor-in-chief.
“My concern is the possibil-
ity that people whose job it is to
identify and represent the voices
of students might have sought to
remove the voices of students by
throwing away the newspapers,”
Clark said.
Ryan Lombardi, senate’s
advisor and vice president for
Student Affairs, said he is “disap-
pointed” with what he has been
hearing, though much of it is
hearsay.
“I don’t know where the truth
lies,” Lombardi said.
more degrees and certificates
awarded from OU — and up-
dated approaches to faculty and
total compensation.
During the resources commit-
tee meeting, the board will receive
an update on the previous fiscal
year, which is ending Nov. 30.
Considering the results of
fiscal year 2014, OU’s revised
budget expenses totaled $577.9
million, with revenues pulling in
at $662 million.
In addition to approving the
next step of the Capital Improve-
ment Plan, the board will review
the Northeast Campus Roadway
Concept, presented by Harry
Wyatt, associate vice president
for Facilities, which proposes
six different modifications to OU
and Athens roadways that could
provide more direct routes of
travel onto campus and Uptown.
“It brings together thoughts
that have been around or dis-
cussed for 15 years,” Wyatt said.
First-Year Student Trustee
Keith Wilbur said he is enthusiastic
for the committee meetings Thurs-
day to see the board’s reaction to
new physical developments from
the Capital Improvement Plan.
“I’m looking forward to it. I’m
excited to get the trustees back
in town and plan construction
projects,” Wilbur said.
defenses,” Orr said. “Ohio, they
run some really good movement
and a lot of ball screens. …
The zone kind of slowed the
movement down a little bit and I
thought defensively, in the zone,
we guarded the three (well).”
In the last 5:16 of the game, the
Falcons never relinquished their
lead despite giving the Bobcats
multiple opportunities to swing
the game back in their favor.
With 2:21 remaining, Ohio
had the ball and trailed the
Falcons 54-53, but a careless
dribble from junior guard Ste-
vie Taylor was stolen by Jehvon
Clarke and converted into an
easy basket to bump Bowling
Green’s lead to three.
“I think my play down the
stretch there was the reason
why (Ohio lost),” Taylor said. “I
put my team in a bad situation.
I haven’t been pleased with my
play at all, so I take full respon-
sibility with what happened out
there tonight.”
After Clarke missed the
front end of a one-and-one with
18 seconds remaining, the Bob-
cats had one last opportunity to
tie the game or send it to over-
time, trailing 58-56.
But strong defense blew up
the play Christian drew up,
resulting in a contested and
missed three-point attempt
from senior guard Nick Kellogg
at the buzzer.
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 4 THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014
@C_HOPPENS
CH203310@OHIOU.EDU
KF398711@OHIOU.EDU
@KELLYPFISHER
BOARD
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
O H I O U N I V E R S I T Y ’ S K E N N E D Y L E C T U R E S E R I E S WE L C O ME S
J
odi
Picoult
J
odi
Picoult
T H E
Kennedy
L E C T U R E S E R I E S
At Ohio University’s Memorial Auditorium
Admission is free.
Seating is limited, doors open at 6:30 PM.
FEBRUARY 4, 2014
TUESDAY, 7:30 PM
The New York Times bestselling author
reveals realities that inspired plotlines
The FACTS
Behind the
FICTION
13 MessAds_MessAd 3 x 5" 1/9/14 4:47 PM Page 1
@DANIELLEROSE84
DK123111@OHIOU.EDU
@DANIELLEROSE84
DK123111@OHIOU.EDU
Meeting
Schedule
Thursday
8:30 a.m. — Joint Academics and
Resources committee
11 a.m. — Tour of Schoonover
Center
12:15 p.m. — Trustee Luncheon
1:30 p.m. — Resources committee
1:30 p.m. — Academics committee
3:30 p.m. — Governance
committee
3:30 p.m. — Audit committee
Friday
7:30 a.m. — Executive committee
10 a.m. — Board of Trustees
Resolutions
Re-vote on the president’s salary
increase, voted in a closed-door
session Nov. 1, 2013
Adopt the OHIO Guarantee
provisions and send to the Ohio
Board of Regents’ chancellor for
approval
Begin schematic design for the
College of Business Expansion,
McCracken Hall renovation and
addition, and the Multiphase
Corrosion Facility Office addition
Approval to begin construction:
Bromley Hall renovation, Central
Food Facility renovation, Lindley
Hall rehabilitation, South Green
Drive extension, South Green
electrical substation replacement,
Stocker Hall air handler
replacement, Treudley and Ryors
halls cabinet refurbishment,
Tupper Hall rehabilitation
Approval of the gift and renaming
of 78 Columbia Ave.
Approval of a Master of Physician
Assistant Studies program in
the College of Health Sciences
and Professions’ Department
of Rehabilitation and
Communication
Approval of a Global Health
Certificate in the College of
Health Sciences and Professions
Approval of an Advisory Board
Appointment for the Kennedy
Museum of Art
After changing his plea from
not guilty to guilty Tuesday,
a man will enter the Athens
County Prosecuting Attorney’s
Diversion Program for taking
more than $5,000 from a woman
without providing his promised
service.
David Marsh, 54, was charged
with one count of theft, a felony
of the fifth degree, according to
the Ohio Revised Code.
Athens County Prosecutor
Keller Blackburn said he had
promised a woman he would
move her trailer, but never pro-
vided the service after he had
collected $5,364 Jan. 13, 2013, ac-
cording to court documents.
The documents also state
that the court will hold Marsh’s
guilty plea in abeyance pending
a report on his progress in the di-
version program from the Athens
County Prosecuting Attorney.
Marsh will also pay the re-
quired $500 upon his acceptance
into the program, though he
could be fined at a maximum of
$2,500 and could face a maximum
prison sentence of one year.
The program is meant to have
offenders who have committed
a low-level felony or a high-level
misdemeanor do something pos-
itive for their community, Black-
burn said in a previous Post ar-
ticle.
The program, funded by par-
ticipant fees and a state grant of
approximately $60,000 per year,
is made up of approximately 100
offenders. Recent participants
have serviced the Dairy Barn
Arts Center, the Hocking Valley
Scenic Railway and the Wayne
National Forest, among others.
Court documents do not list
the date that Marsh will begin
his services in the program.
KELLY FISHER
STAFF WRITER
KF398711@OHIOU.EDU
@KELLYPFISHER
Local man pleads guilty to theft,
may enter service program
Accusations of theft cause more trouble for Senate
MBB
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
PAPERS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
@AKARL_SMITH
AS299810@OHIOU.EDU
REPORTS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
INCIDENT REPORTS
ALL ASSAULTS
102.25
In 2009, the
department
put more of an
emphasis on its
own presence in
town.
INCIDENT REPORTS
CRIMINAL
DAMAGING/
VANDALISM
222.5
In 2009, the
department
put more of an
emphasis on its
own presence in
town.
CALLS FOR
SERVICE
NARCOTICS
68.6
In 2008, the
department
concluded its
participation in
a multi-county
drug task force.
TRAFFIC STOP
1,584
About 2008 and
2009, patrols
and general
officer presence
in town was
made more of a
priority, which led
to an increase
in traffic stops,
officials said.
ALCOHOL RELATED
ARRESTS
523
In 2008, the
department
changed its
“reporting
matrix,” or what
crimes were
considered an
alcohol-related
arrest, and
placed more of
an emphasis
on behavioral
issues.
2004-2008 NUMBERS
2004-2007 NUMBERS
2009-2012 NUMBERS
2008-2012 NUMBERS
Athens Incidents
Because of increased presence and changing emphasis from liquor violations,
enforcement of Athens Police Department decreases crime rate in Athens
presence during those hours.”
McCall also linked the de-
crease in reports of vandalism
to the increased police presence
in town, but he said a high per-
centage of these crimes happen
around campus and Uptown is
never solved.
Mayor Paul Wiehl said he first
heard of these trends after a conver-
sation with Chief Pyle late last year.
“Obviously, it’s a good thing,
Wiehl said. “There is still room for
improvement as always.”
He said a trend of thefts
“against the student population”
when they leave town during long
breaks is worrisome.
There were five reports of stu-
dent residences burglarized dur-
ing the first two weeks of January,
when students would have been
returning from winter break, ac-
cording to a previous Post article.
Alcohol-related arrests have
been nearly cut in half since 2004,
when the officers started using a
new “reporting matrix” for mak-
ing these arrests.
“We were much more focused
on alcohol-related arrests, just
any alcohol violation, and now it’s
on behavior and not whether or
not someone has a beer in their
possession,” Pyle said.
“Also a switch in emphasis
from liquor violations more to
traffic enforcement, noise en-
forcement, things like that, so
there has been a shift in our
enforcement priorities over the
years,” he said.
In regards to narcotics, Pyle
said the drop is directly connect-
ed to a drug task force APD par-
ticipated in with other agencies in
Athens and Washington counties.
“So there was a more regional-
wide effort for clamping down on
drug issues,” Pyle said.
He added the department still
participates in a mini task force
involving the Ohio University Po-
lice Department and the Athens
County Sheriff’s Office.
The 2013 annual report will be
released once Wiehl approves it,
Pyle said, adding he doesn’t know
when that will be.
APD
changes
emphasis
Bobcats disappoint on the court
Constructive budget to come
LaForest, others resign
@MARIADEVITO13
MD781510@OHIOU.EDU
core, Pelibus, offctem que
nullupt atistet fugitaquia
cum faceaquam eum rate
faceaquam eum rateDus
Evan Taylor
resigned as
the senator for
College of Fine
Arts because he
didn’t have the
time for senate
8:31 P.M.
Jacob Chaffn
withdrew his
name for the
vice president
position because
he can’t “work
on a body that
doesn’t value
democracy” the
same way he
does
8:46 P.M.
Emma Wright
elected as interim
vice president
9:34 P.M.
President Anna
Morton read
Austin LaForest’s
statement of
resignation
for senate’s
“bullying”
9:48 P.M.
Adam Brown
voted in as
senate treasurer,
throwing him out
of the senate vice
president race
9:52 P.M.
Voted to
postpone
vice president
elections; Ohio
University
students will be
able to vote for
vice president
9:30 P.M.
TIMELINE CONTINUED FROM 1
A roundup of events from Wednesday’s Student Senate meeting.
Others senators who resigned included
Evan Taylor, fine arts senator, and Treasurer
Austin LaForest, whom senator Adam Brown
called, “one of the most genuine people to
serve on this body.”
Although LaForest did not attend the
meeting, a statement prepared by him was
read aloud by Morton and cited “bullying and
politicking inside and outside of the senate
body” as factors in his decision to resign.
Brown was quickly voted in as senate
treasurer.
“I think there was some really rich dis-
cussion tonight, some really good conver-
sation,” said Ryan Lombardi, senate’s advi-
sor and vice president for Student Affairs.
“I’m encouraged by some of the progress
and some of the conversation we’ve heard
here tonight.”
SENATE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
A large number of Ohio University students participated in the student speak-
out portion of the meeting. These students encouraged student senate to
host an open election so that all students can vote for a new student senate
vice president and succeeded.
CB536511@OHIOU.EDU
Mother
pleads guilty
to theft
KELLY FISHER
STAFF WRITER
Botswana reaches
out to OU to renew
their longstanding
relationship
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 5
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Front Desk Hours:
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Cost: 10 words: $3 students, $3.75
businesses, $.10 each additional
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The Post will not print advertisements
that violate local, state or federal laws.
All advertisements must display good
taste. The Post reserves the right to refuse
any advertisement. If questions arise, the
editor will make the fnal decision.
The Post will not run real estate or
employment advertisements that dis-
criminate on the basis of race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status,
sexual orientation or national origin. All
advertisements are subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act.
Phone numbers will not be printed in
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If errors are found in a classifed ad,
please notify The Post by 4 p.m. the day
the ad runs. Though The Post cannot be
responsible for errors, a corrected ad will
run free of charge on the next publication
date. Cash refunds will not be given.
Notify The Post by 4 p.m. of cancella-
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Ads cannot be taken by telephone.
Ads are not accepted after 4 p.m. The
Post reception offce is located on the
third foor of Baker Center.
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Last season, Ohio finished
6-23 and recorded just one win
in Mid-American Conference
play.
But this year, the Bobcats sit
in second place in the MAC East
and have the opportunity to
continue their hot start to con-
ference play against Akron on
Thursday.
The Bobcats (8-8, 3-2 MAC)
will travel to play their in-state
foe with hopes of rebounding
from Ohio’s 79-63 loss Saturday
against Ball State. However, de-
spite the Zips (8-8, 2-3 MAC) bol-
stering a similar record, Akron
is a juggernaut, offensively.
“Akron is tremendous on of-
fense,” coach Bob Boldon said.
“They could score 100 (points) on
us. So, you gotta figure out, are
you going to try to score 101 or
try to hold them to a number we
can score. You kinda have to pick
your poison and try to get better
at something during the week.”
The Zips have been domi-
nant on their home court, having
posted a 7-1 record, and are aver-
aging 81.4 points per game on the
season, compared to the Ohio’s
64.7 points.
Akron is coming off a 71-51
victory against Kent State on
Saturday and made 25 of its 30
attempts from the field.
Comparatively, the Bobcats
defeated the Golden Flashes last
Wednesday 76-59 after posting
48 second-half points.
With a high-scoring offense
comes impact players and Akron
boasts the two leading scorers in
the conference.
Senior forward Rebecca Tec-
ca averages 24 points and almost
nine boards per contest, while
senior guard Hanna Luburgh
posts 23 points, seven rebounds
and two assists per game.
The Bobcats have three
players averaging double-digit
points, including junior guard
Mariah Byard, who had a brace
on her left wrist and did not par-
ticipate in team drills in prac-
tices this week. She has missed
the past four games because of
an injury.
Kiyanna Black, a sophomore
guard who leads the team in the
scoring, averages 13.5 points
per game. Black stepped aside
towards the end of Wednesday’s
practice with pain in her right
shoulder, but returned to play af-
ter stretching with a trainer.
“There’s starting to be some
expectations of winning and
that’s a good thing,” Boldon said.
“But it does come with pressure
sometimes. In those times, you
have to go about your fundamen-
tals and do things the right way.”
Preparing for battle
OU reunites with
Botswana, talk on
educational friendship
KATIE KLANN | FILE PHOTO
Ohio University sophomore, Kat Yelle, drives the ball against Xavier University. The Bob-
cats fought the Musketeers on November 10, 2013.
A delegation from Botswana
was in Athens this week to meet
with multiple Ohio University
college representatives in an
effort to better establish the
school’s partnership with the
country.
Botswana, a country located
in southern Africa, has had a
relationship with OU for about
50 years, originating around
the same time the university’s
African Studies program was
created.
Included in the visiting
team was Grace Muzila,
permanent secretary of the
Ministry of Education and Skills
Development of Botswana.
“In 2012 there was a team
from Ohio University which
visited Botswana. That’s when
we started resuscitating this
relationship in a number of
ways,” Muzila said.
Since arriving Sunday,
Muzila and her team have
kept a busy schedule, meeting
with representatives from the
College of Business, the Patton
College of Education, and the
College of Health Sciences and
Professions.
Accompanying Muzila
from Botswana was Emolemo
Morake, Deputy Chief of
Mission.
Morake emphasized the
importance of American
students being more exposed
to the people of Botswana in
an effort to learn and cultivate
friendships.
“Not so many people
know about Botswana in this
country,” Morake said. “So
we were hoping that as the
students go and interact with
their peers (in Botswana), when
they come back they will tell
their counterparts here about
the country.”
Working closely with
the representatives from
Botswana was Lorna Jean
Edmonds, OU’s vice provost
for Global Affairs.
She also emphasized the
importance of students learning
from the people of Botswana,
and says that this partnership
is something that not enough
people know about.
“We know that building a
global economy is about building
friendships, and building
friendships starts in higher
education,” Edmonds said.
TAYLOR MAPLE
FOR THE POST
CHARLIE HATCH
FOR THE POST
“We know that building a
global economy is about
building friendships, and
building friendships starts
in higher education.”
—Lorna Jean Edmonds
OU’s vice provost for
Global Affairs
WHO: Ohio (8-8, 3-2 MAC) at
Akron (8-8, 2-3 MAC)
WHEN: Wednesday at 7 p.m.
WHERE: James A. Rhodes Arena
— The Bobcats are second in the
MAC East, while the Zips sit in third.
— Akron averages more than 81
points per game.
Upnext
The Bobcats brace for the Zips killer offense
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
@TAYLORMAPLE
TM255312@OHIOU.EDU
@CHARLIEHATCH_
GH181212@OHIOU.EDU
Many people are well aware
of Martin Luther King Jr.’s ac-
complishments in the civil
rights movement, but behind
the scene was an influential
unsung hero in the LGBT com-
munity.
Ohio University’s LGBT
Center will be showing Broth-
er Outsider for its Queer Hol-
lywood series, highlighting
and honoring the efforts of Ba-
yard Rustin in the civil rights
movement.
Rustin was one of Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr.’s right-hand
men and an openly gay black
man who helped to organize
events like the March on Wash-
ington.
Delfin Bautista, director of
the LGBT Center, said the film
would shed new perspective
on those who made an impact
in the civil rights movement.
“(We hope) to enrich the
narrative around civil rights
and that time in history,” Bau-
tista said. “Folks like Dr. King
and Malcolm X have taken the
spotlight and with good rea-
son; their contributions and
testimonies are remarkable.
But there were many other
people who were involved in
the movement and who were
instrumental.”
For Morgan Morgan, an
LGBT Center student worker
and a senior studying commu-
nications, she said she is inter-
ested in learning about the life
of Rustin throughout the civil
rights movement.
“Some people throughout
history, and also in everyday
life, play the role of the per-
son backstage and no one ever
hears about them or knows
about them and they don’t get
the credit they deserve,” Mor-
gan said.
Using film and community
as a tool, Bautista said Rus-
tin’s story is an easy way to
lead into hot-button subjects.
“When we talk about race it
can become a very heated con-
versation. When we talk about
sexuality it can become very
heated, so the two of those to-
gether can become even more
heated,” Bautista said. “But the
documentary is an easy way
to ease into that conversation
and not overwhelm people.”
Not only does Morgan hope
to learn more, but said she
wants students to appreciate
the work and effort that goes
into change within our country.
“Our generation, we want
change and we want things to
happen and we have all these
causes that we want to sup-
port, but a lot of people … ei-
ther don’t have the knowledge
or just refuse to learn what
kind of work goes into that,”
Morgan said. “And I think that
this film is probably a really
great example of that.”
Vibraphones, various rigged
percussion instruments and a
mixture of live and recorded
vocals will replace the tradi-
tional guitar, bass, drum com-
bination that is the usual at the
Union Bar & Grill.
no.brow.music.col lective,
led by graduate percussion
student Aaron Butler with Jo-
seph Van Hassel, Turner Mat-
thews and Jake Schlaerth,
will be performing a 30-min-
ute, 11-movement piece titled
“Hanuman’s Leap,” composed
by Elliot Cole, who will join
no.brow in the performance.
Cole originally composed
“Hanuman’s Leap” for an eight-
piece choir in New York, but
this performance of the piece
shows a much different com-
position, with Cole performing
the vocal parts by himself us-
ing backing tracks, and joined
by the no.brow.’s percussion
quartet.
“I was impatient and scrap-
py and I wanted to (perform
the piece) myself,” said Cole,
a Ph.D. candidate at Princeton
said.
The idea behind the piece
was to tell a story by using his
own voice in to tell it, backed
by the percussion, Cole said.
He ranges from extremely low
registers reminiscent of throat
singing to higher pitches to
achieve it.
“I wanted to find some reg-
isters and use those different
registers in a dynamic, fun,
musical way,” Cole explained.
The piece blends many dif-
ferent genres together that
may sound odd on paper, But-
ler said, but in the context of
hearing Cole’s music, it sounds
much more normal.
“It takes all these things
like beat poetry and hip-hop
and Elliot somehow slams
all these things together and
makes this thing you don’t
even second-guess that he
weaves all these disparate el-
ements together,” Butler said.
Because the show is taking
place at the Union, Butler said
he booked other acts to make
it more of a rock show than a
performance at a concert hall.
In addition to no.brow.’s
performance with Cole, a duo
of ambient drone musicians
Andrew Langaplay and Jacob
Kessler will perform, with pro-
jections to pair with the music.
Cincinnati jazz group Us, To-
day and Athens experimental
pop group Popsicle Rose will
round out the show.
“This isn’t a normal thing
that would happen in Ath-
ens,” said Turner Matthews,
of no.brow. and Popsicle Rose.
“It’s really cool to play at the
Union because it fits the piece
because it’s pretty metal and
cool.”
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A barrage of setbacks have
marred the long-awaited open-
ing of the Walter Fieldhouse
for months, and this time in-
hospitable weather, delays in
heating the facility and delib-
eration about drop-down net-
ting will ultimately keep most
students from setting foot on
the facility’s artificial turf or
track until Fall Semester.
Construction workers will
essentially hit “pause” on its
progress in early March to
allow Ohio’s athletic teams,
namely the football team,
to take part in their spring
workouts indoors. Workers
will continue plugging away
at the building’s exterior, but
the track and netting system
will remain unfinished until
mid-April, with a “full-bore”
opening slated for the fall, said
Ryan Lombardi, Ohio Univer-
sity vice president for Student
Affairs.
“Even doing this thing
for football, they’ve been re-
ally frustrated because … it’s
supposed to be open by now,
right?” Lombardi said. “It’s sup-
posed to be open for bowl prac-
tice, and none of those things
have happened. We’ve never hit
any of those milestones, but
there’s only so much you can
do with construction.”
Despite the delay, students
are still going to foot their
share of the fieldhouse’s bill,
Lombardi said, because there
are still costs associated
with opening it for Athletics’
use. Student funds totaling
$822,000 annually have been
set aside for fieldhouse debt
and maintenance, according to
a previous Post article.
No new student workers
will be hired to staff the facil-
ity this spring, said Mark Fer-
guson, OU executive director
of campus recreation. Ping
Center student workers will
staff the facility to “provide
students with opportunities to
get experience in different ven-
ues,” Ferguson said.
OU is still in the process of
hiring a director for the field-
house. Ping Center and Walter
Fieldhouse staff will be “work-
ing fairly closely” once the fa-
cility is open for all student use,
Ferguson said. About $35,000
of the fieldhouse’s $150,000 an-
nual budget will be used to pay
student workers, according to a
previous Post article.
Ferguson also said pow-
er has been installed in the
fieldhouse and that the con-
struction crew is working to
connect the facility to OU’s
steam tunnels. Permanent heat
should be installed by the end
of the month, he said.
“That steam is directly tied
to heating the facility, which
affects a lot of the other pro-
cesses,” he said. “In some of
these frigid temperatures,
(workers) are in there, and it’s
cold.”
The university also decided
on a netting system that will
allow the track team, for ex-
ample, to practice undisturbed
while as many as three sepa-
rate intramural games span
the turf widthwise — each
separated from the others by a
ceiling-to-floor net. There will
also be a batting cage in one
of the end zones, one side of
which will be outfitted for use
as a golf net.
Lombardi said that the net-
ting system stands to be one of
the facility’s best assets.
“In my mind, the nets are
what make it a multifunctional
facility,” he said. “Otherwise
it’s just a big football field with
a track around it, right?”
Fieldhouse completion pushed back
Little-known LGBT, civil rights hero
to be highlighted in ‘Brother Outsider’
Multiple genres collide at the Union
WHAT: Queer Hollywoood,
“Baker Center”
WHERE: LGBT Center, Baker
University Center, Room 354
WHEN: Friday, Jan. 24, 2-4 p.m.
ADMISSION: Free
If You Go
Construction will
be halted on the
new building to give
athletes time to train.
JIM RYAN
ASST. MANAGING EDITOR
JIM RYAN | File Photo
The Walter Fieldhouse remains under construction, and completion has been pushed back again. Officials hope that the facility will be used by student groups
and classes as well as athletics.
JR992810@OHIOU.EDU
@JIMRYAN015
DYLAN SAMS
STAFF WRITER
@DRUSSELL23
DS834910@OHIOU.EDU
WHAT: no.brow.music.collective
with Elliot Cole, and Andrew
Lampela and Jacob Koestler, Us,
Today, and Popsicle Rose
WHEN: 9:30 p.m., Thursday
WHERE: The Union Bar & Grill,
18 W. Union St.
ADMISSION: $5
If You Go
REBEKAH BARNES
FOR THE POST
@REB_BARNES
RB605712@OHIOU.EDU
RECAPS BREAKING NEWS
&
visit www.thepost.ohio.edu for
all day, every day.
As much as the weather has
had a hard time figuring out what
to do with itself, the gas prices in
Ohio are doing pretty much the
same thing.
Unfortunately this is not new
for Athens County residents as,
historically, they have always had
higher than average gas prices.
“I think it has to do with where
it’s being transported,” said Carol
Willoughby, manager of PA’s Sure
Stop at 8942 United Ln., located
near State Route 33.
She added that the price could
go either way and it usually doesn’t
depend on the season.
The lowest price for gas in Ath-
ens County Wednesday afternoon,
$3.37, was still higher than the U.S.
and Ohio averages, $3.28 and $3.31
respectively, according to Gas-
buddy.com, a website that uses
user-reported data to gauge local
and national gas price trends.
However, the U.S. average
price for a gallon of regular gas
has been slightly falling. The price
for a gallon of regular was $3.30
on Jan. 20, which is three cents
less than the week before and two
cents cheaper than last year, ac-
cording to U.S. Energy Informa-
tion Administration.
“Some areas may have higher
prices due to gasoline taxes, but
most likely due to healthy compe-
tition,” said Patrick DeHaan, Se-
nior Petroleum Analyst from Gas-
buddy.com. “There may be less gas
stations, less owner diversity.”
“Gasoline prices in Ohio have
been on a bit of a roller coaster
the last month,” he added, “There
hasn’t really been a steady trend
in gasoline prices in Ohio that’s
lasted more than a week or so.
Prices fluctuate often in Ohio, and
tend to rise and fall faster than the
national average.”
When asked for the possibility
of the cold weather’s effect on gas
prices, DeHaan said it all depends
on the gasoline demand. “Prices
tend to be among their lowest for
the year in the coldest months
when gasoline demand is at its
lowest.”
“When the gas price fluctu-
ates like this, it affects me and
my friends a great deal,” said Ivan
Velez, a senior majoring in Com-
munication Studies. “When we
travel, we don’t just go to Nelson-
ville. We go from Columbus to
Michigan and everywhere.”
SUHYEON PARK
FOR THE POST
@_SUHYEONPARK
SP317712@OHIO.EDU
County deals
with consistently
higher gas prices
Although U.S. prices are
falling, Athens gas has
stayed above national
and state averages.
“When the gas price
fluctuates like this, it
affects me and my friends
a great deal. When we
travel, we don’t just go to
Nelsonville. We go from
Columbus to Michigan and
everywhere.”
—Ivan Velez
senior majoring in
Communication Studies
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